PSDB Body Armour Standard, 1995

UK Police and Home Office Ballistic Standard PSDB (1995) - Body Armour

The 1995 PSDB Ballistic body armour test standard defines a revised method of accessing the protection provided by commercial body armour systems against the current firearms threat to the Police Forces of the United Kingdom. This latest revision of the standard now incorporates a test method for armour systems giving protection against high velocity rifle calibre ammunition.

PSDB Level Bullet
Resistance
Weight Grains Maximum Velocity
m/s (ft/s)
Energy
Joules
No. of strikes
Angle of incidence
- 0 deg 30 deg
HG1 Low Handgun 9mm GECO DM11A1B2
9mm Magnum Norma 19107
123
158
370 (1215)
395 (1295)
550
800
4
4
2
2
HG2 High Handgun /
Calibre
9mm GECO DM11A1B2
9mm Magnum Norma 19107
.44 Magnum Rem R44MG2
123
158
240
435 (1425)
460 (1510)
450 (1475)
460
1080
1570
4
4
4
2
2
2
RF1 Rifle Rifle 7.62mm Calibre 144 830 - - -
SG1 Shotgun Shotgun 12 gauge true cylinder 437 435 - - -

PSDB Standard allows a minimum distance between strikes of 50mm and 50mm from the edge.

General Requirements:
A body armour system should afford protection against injury from penetration by the bullet and the blunt trauma effects of the impact whilst ensuring that the movement of the wearer is not unduly restricted. The protected area should include the torso to ensure coverage of the vital organs, in particular the heart, liver, spine, kidneys and spleen. Each model of ballistic body armour should meet one of four protection classes as shown below.

The protection class required by the wearer should be determined from the specific firearms threats they are likely to encounter.

The ballistic insert should be removable to enable the outer jacket to be laundered when necessary. To ensure that the ballistic pack is inserted correctly into the jacket an information panel must be permanently attached to show the side of the pack that is worn against the body.

In addition, the following information should be included: the manufacturer's name, date of manufacture, and batch number, the protection of the armour and set instructions for cleaning and use. Similarly, if a separate trauma pack is used, this should also display information to ensure it is inserted correctly.

The associated ballistic insert panel should include a warning that the separate trauma pack must be used in conjunction with the ballistic pack to meet the stated protection level.

The armour system should be available in a variety of sizes to allow for suitable variation in height and build of the wearers. It should also be adjustable to allow the wearer maximum comfort. It should be possible for the wearer to fire weapons from both shoulders without restriction. Consideration should be given to the jacket design so that protection may be upgraded by the insertion of an additional ballistic panel or hard plate.

Any additional small panels supplied for protection of the neck, groin, shoulders etc should be constructed of the same material as the main ballistic panels

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